2019 – A Review.

Well as I haven’t been great at keeping this blog up to date (as usual), I’ve got a whistle-stop review of the year all in one post. Where I have blogged previously about events, I’ve linked to the post. As I’ve always said, this is for me, to remind me of what I’ve done and where I’ve been.  If you are interested enough to ready it then that’s great, I’m sorry it’s so long! 

Firstly, a crafty review of the year.  After a really slow start, I really picked up the pace from about September onwards and finished up completing 14 separate projects (12 if you count the baby outfit made up of three items as one project).

January saw me complete my first big crochet project with the draught excluder.  This taught me a lot and has stood me in good stead to tackle other things this year. Next up was April with Herbarium, a really pretty shawl done using mosaic knitting which is a new technique to me.  Nothing then until September when the gift knitting and crocheting took over.  I squeezed in the hat (Wynn) right at the end of December to finish the year on 14 completes rather than 13, although I’m not superstitious really. Click on the thumbnails for the larger pictures.

So, onto the year in general. Overall it’s been a good one, lots of weekend breaks, holidays, theatre visits and general getting out and about-ness going on. 

January – Quiet start to the year with the only event of note being Saturday Night Fever at New Theatre with Mason and Rosie. I blogged it here

Colourful fountains

February – Starting to get busier now.  We had the wonderful Knife Angel and the Brick History lego exhibition, both of which I blogged here .   My sister Ann and Sisters-in law Chris and Lynne also recommenced our monthly evenings out for tea.  I really look forward to and enjoy this as without a central hub that we all visit (i.e. my mum!) it has become too easy to lose touch of what is going on in each other’s lives and families.  Speaking of families, we also had a lovely afternoon out with our brother-in-law William, a few beers, bite to eat and then back to the bus station via Victoria Square to see the fountains in full colour glory.

March – I had a couple of volunteer shifts this month. Firstly at the beginning of the month, I did a Sunday morning at the Ferens for the Open Exhibition,I enjoyed this as I just love being able to spend time looking around at the Ferens and if it isn’t a busy shift, there is plenty of time to do that.  Then at the end of the month, I volunteered at one of the public open days of the archaelogical dig of the South Blockhouse, King Henry VIII’s fortifications of Hull. I blogged this here

No Pasaran

In the middle of the month, there was the unveiling of a new memorial to the nine men and one woman from our area who in the 1930s, went off to fight with the International Brigade against Franco’s Facist army in Spain.  Four of these brave volunteers never returned and although there is already a plaque inside the Guildhall (which only has eight names on it for some reason), it isn’t exactly accessible to the public.  Funds for this sculpture were raised by the Hull International Brigade Memorial Group.  I missed the unveiling but went to see the memorial a few days later and I think it’s really eye-catching.  I hope it will make people look and question it’s purpose.  Goodness only knows that in these hate filled times, we need to celebrate those unselfish heroes who were willing to give their lives for the freedom of others.  You can read more about the sculpture here and the International Brigades Memorial Trusts here

April –  Theatre visit this month was to see The Full Monty starring Gary Lucy as Gaz, the whole cast were excellent and it was a fantastic show.  Debbie and I thoroughly enjoyed it and it was just the laugh a minute that we needed.  So, did they do the ‘full monty’ at the end?  Well if you haven’t seen the show, I won’t spoil it for you.

I’ve wanted to visit The Bunker at Holmpton for a while now and I persuaded Patrick that this was a good use of a the first Sunday of the month.  After a lovely Sunday lunch in The Station pub in Patrington, we continued down the road to Holmpton.  There stands an unassuming looking bungalow, the likes of which were built in various parts of the country and which hide beneath their ground floor a nuclear bunker filled with technology to monitor aircraft and other military activity during the Cold War period.  Built in the 1950s as an early radar warning station and used by the Royal Observatory Corps during the 1980s  ,it was decomissioned in 1991 but used for training for several years.  It was sold by the RAF in 2014 and the owners and volunteers have put so much work into creating a fantastic resource for the history of this period.  I found it fascinating and would highly recommend a visit.

April also saw us volunteering at our annual local CAMRA branch Beer Festival. Held in the wonderful Hull Minster, this is a great event. We love to work a few shifts, it’s great fun although hard work.  I have the greatest respect and admiration for the whole committee who take leave from their jobs to dedicate the full week to setting up, working throughout and clearing away.  I don’t think the public realise how much work goes into this, I certainly didn’t give it much thought until I became involved myself.

At the end of the month, Patrick and I visited Skipton for their CAMRA beer festival. We stayed in the most beautiful little cottage and I blogged about our stay here.

May – Our annual trip to Thornwick Bay to the same caravan as our previous two visits.  Unfortunately we were not so lucky with the weather as we have been other years and it was damp and misty all day on the Saturday so I didn’t get to go up the lighthouse which I had planned to do. Sunday was better weather and we spent the day at Bempton.  Blog post about the weekend here.

Also this month we saw Turn and Face the Strange at Hull Truck.  My third time and Patrick’s second, we had also brought along William, his sister Emma and brother-in-law Chris who all really enjoyed the show.  It is a multi-media production documenting the life of Hull born Mick Ronson, one of David Bowie’s Spiders from Mars and a hugely talented musician and producer.  Sadly passed away at the young age of 47 in 1993, this show, written by Hull’s Rupert Creed and Garry Burnett, who act as narrators throughout,  pays tribute to Mick’s lovely, down to earth personality and massive talent.  If you ever get chance to see this if it comes around again, don’t miss it.

June – First outing of the month was with our friends Pete and Donna to Kardomah94 to see L’il Jimmy Reid.  After huge pizzas in the restaurant at the front, which none of us managed to finish, it was through to the theatre in the back for the show.  I blogged it here.   Sadly, Kardomah has since closed, due to ill-health of the owner.  A sad loss to Hull’s culture vultures as this place show-cased acts that wouldn’t draw a large enough audience for other venues.  We don’t have enough small, intimate theatre spaces and this one was rather special.   

The end of June saw us heading to Cornwall for our annual holiday.  I started to blog each day as it happened but lost track half-way through.  I will continue it at some point though and you can read the story so far starting here.  Of course my better half is much better at blogging than I am and you can read his version of events here.

Victoria & Albert Museum

July – Gosh we had a busy one this month.  First up was Hyde Park Summer.  Several weeks ago, Pete and Donna had asked if we fancied going to one of the Summer in Hyde Park concerts with Robbie Williams headlining and featuring Texas on the line-up along with Keane and Blackeyed Peas.  We agreed at the time but then when starting to add up the cost of travel and hotels were actually beginning to regret it. However, tickets had been bought through Groupon and were non-refundable so we set out to make the best of it. After an initial hiccup after booking a fraudulent AirBnB and having to be refunded for that, I managed to book us into the Travelodge at Covent Garden for a bargain price.  We had the most fantastic weekend and although Texas’s set was disappointingly short (I believe they had another gig to get to), Robbie was at his best and had the whole crowd eating out of his hand.  London was as fabulous as always and with great friends to share it with we didn’t want it to end.  Patrick’s blog post here.  During this weekend, we visited the Victoria and Albert Museum for the first time.  Free to enter and far too big to see all in one visit we will definitely be back at this amazing place, we didn’t even scratch the surface!

The main event for me in July was my son, Michael’s graduation with a PhD in Computer Science.  I think the new Dr. Michael Walker was quite pleased with himself.  His dad, brother and I certainly were proud.  We had a lovely day, although Michael got the time of the reception wrong so by the time we arrived in York, we’d missed it!  The ceremony itself for these things is a bit tedious as, let’s all be honest here, the only graduate any of us is interested in is our own son or daughter so sitting through everyone else’s kids isn’t the most exciting thing to do.  After the ceremony, we went into York and had a nice meal at a Thai restaurant called Phranakhon, described as Thai tapas, it was small plates of food so you could sample different dishes.  Wonderful food and a nice atmosphere.  I’d definitely go again.

Next up was my Christmas present from Patrick, a Pulman dining experience on the East Lancashire Railway.  We’d seen the dining cars last time we were in Bury for the Stumble gig in October 2018 and I’d remarked how wonderful I thought it would be to get dressed up and to dine in one of these carriages on a steam train. I can tell you it was amazing.  It is a black-tie event so the cruise outfits came out of storage for the occasion.  I felt a bit of a twit walking through Bury dressed up like we were going to the Ritz but once at the station, we were obviously part of the crowd.  It was so nice to see everyone in their finery and what made it really nice for me was that a young lady came over to me and told me that I looked stunning.  I returned the compliment, because she did too but it really made me feel good to have a stranger make a point of complimenting me like that.  Patrick looked gorgeous in his dinner suit too.  Once on the train, the food and service were spot on.  We made the mistake of ordering a beer thinking we may be waiting for our food but it arrived quite quickly, before the beer actually so with the wine waiting for us, we wished we hadn’t bothered with beer.  It was a really special experience and both of us said we’d love to do it again.  Patrick’s blog post here

Lastly, at the end of the month, we visited Bolton for the RL Challenge Cup semi final featuring Hull FC.  Bolton is a bit of dump (well the part we saw was anyway), Hull lost (being a Rovers’ fan, I didn’t laugh much, honest) and although we had a giggle with Harry and Janette, it was mostly a forgettable weekend to be honest.

August – A quieter month, at the beginning we had a lovely meal out with our friends ‘The Crew’.  Andy and Jenny were up from Colchester so it was a full complement of eight of us.  We met in Pave, where we sat outside and I had a bee crawl up the inside of my trouser leg!  We managed to rescue it with no harm done to either me or the bee and then Patrick went inside to get some water and sugar to revive it as it was clearly not feeling very well(nothing to do with me I hasten to add).  After all that excitement, we moved on to one of our favourite restaurants, The Persian.  The owner is a lovely man of 70, always friendly and helpful.  A good time was had by all.

Also this month we finally got around to having gates and a fence on the driveway.  All in all the driveway has been costly but it looks lovely.

 

 

On 24th August, we went to Headingley for the fourth day of the Ashes match, due to me bidding for tickets in a charity auction and winning them.  I’ll leave it to Patrick to tell the story of ‘The Greatest Day Out’.  This game will go down in cricketing history and I’m so pleased to be able to say that WE WERE THERE.

Over the bank holiday weekend we made our first ever visit to North Cave Wetlands, a Yorkshire Wildlife Trust reserve.  What a lovely place to visit with excellent, warm and comfortable hides from which to watch the various birds and other wildlife.  It was a really hot day and the highland cattle were keeping themselves cool standing in ponds which made for good photo opportunities.  We’ll definitely go back again.

Finally, on the last weekend of August we had the Freedom Festival.  This annual event has always been my favourite of the year and I look forward to it with great anticipation.  It has grown year on year and got better and better, except for this year and last if I’m totally honest. The event used to be held mostly over the marina area and the local pubs had outside bars where you could get a decent ale to drink as you wandered around to see the various acts.  There was always a tent with spoken word artists on stage and at least two or three music stages with various bands and artists performing throughout the days and evenings.  Dance acts on the Stage @theDock as well as the circus type acts performing in the streets and on pop up stages here and there.  In 2018, the decision was made to move the main festival to Queen’s Gardens, the bars are just generic lager/cider bars, the spoken word tent is no longer and the acts are more foreign rent-a-circus with any music being limited to Zebedee’s Yard.  It has completely lost that vibe and atmosphere and I found it really disappointing.  The one stand-out act for me was the wonderful On  Edge by Justice in Motion which was a dance act highlighting modern slavery in the construction industry with a very moving story.

Justice in Motion perform On Edge at Freedom Festival

One more thing to mention for August, this is the month I started doing the Couch to 5K running program again.  I did this a few years back but then never continued with the running.  This time around, I am really enjoying it and actually looking forward to each day’s run.

View from The Market Cat

September – Patrick’s birthday month so we decided to book a trip to York on the train.  We had a great day and even found a new bar, The Market Cat, with a wonderful view from the top floor.  

The BBC spoken word festival, Contains Strong Language which started in Hull in 2017 is held each year in September and this year I had booked myself a ticket for the opening event, Richard Strange singing the songs of Lou Reed at Middleton Hall, which is part of Hull University so just around the corner for me.  I wasn’t sure what to expect but what a fantastic gig it was.  The musicians were world class, all had great pedigree and had played with the world’s top artists and Richard Strange (by name and nature I think) was just amazing, carrying off the songs like he owned them.  I do wish I had persuaded Patrick to go along because I’m sure he would also have enjoyed it.  It was one of those concerts that you just don’t want to end but sadly it did.  

Also back on for the festival, an event that we’d missed out on during Freedom Festival.  Fair Winds and Following Seas was a collaboration between Hull poet Vicky Foster and Hull band, Broken Orchestra.  It was a walking tour of the River Hull with ethereal music interrupted by Vicky’s poetry at strategic points along the way, all done by GPS (modern technology, what a marvel eh!).  So, I’d booked tickets for the Sunday and the weather was seriously bloody awful, windy, cold and heavy rain.  We had arranged to meet William too and we all arrived at Scale Lane bridge,wrapped up in waterproof clothing with our headphones and the app for the walk all ready to go.  We had a briefing inside the bridge before setting off, weather was dry at this point luckily.  It was really clever the way the poetry started up as you reached certain points on the walk.  The highlight for me was getting access to the inside of Drypool bridge in order to cross Alfred Gelder Street safely.  We went up inside, saw the inner workings of the bridge and looked out of the window and then back down the other side and out again.  I was made up I can tell you.  I’ve always wanted to go inside the bridges since I was a little kid.  Further along the river and back along High Street and the rain started again, by the time we got to the end point at the pier, we were soaked and freezing and the Minerva pub was a welcome sight.

October – A big moment for me this month, after completing C25K I joined with the East Hull Fitmums 2 mile group.  It was a bit of a struggle keeping up but thankfully there was another newbie with me who struggled a bit too.  We managed the whole run though and everyone was really supportive. I was in the walking group previously but always intended moving up to the runners.  Sadly the next run I did was the last one of the year as my knee started to really hurt and despite having physio, is still painful now. It’s nothing serious,  just ‘runners knee’, quite common apparently. I managed a short 2km run last week but nothing since as it is too painful.  I may need more physio or just strengthening exercises.

Also in October, we went with our local CAMRA branch to the Keighley and Worth Valley Railway beer festival.  Patrick has blogged here.  A good day out but I think a bit too expensive and we probably won’t do it again.

Theatre outing this month was to see Blood Brothers.  I’ve seen this four times now and it was Patrick’s second time and Debbie’s first.  It was great but I think I have probably seen it enough times now.  It doesn’t have the same impact after this many viewings but the comedy and music is still brilliant.  We had tea at Operetta before the show and although the service is incredibly slow (to be fair, the waiter looks to be about 80), the food is always very good and prices reasonable.

November – Yarnfest, blogged here. Theatre outing was Kinky Boots.  We had seen this in London with Coral and William and loved it.  It is one of Debbie’s favourite films so she was looking forward to it and we met Lizzie and her fella Charles at the Kingston Theatre Hotel for a bite to eat before the show.  The food was a bit disappointing I thought.  Most of us going for chicken chasseur from the specials board, the chicken was overcooked and the portion wasn’t overly generous for the price.  The food here used to be really excellent but I’m not sure I’d rush back again.  The show was spectacular and we all loved it.

Later in November, we had a lovely evening at our house with the crew.  We had decided on a tapas theme and cooked a variety of dishes including an experimental chicken and chorizo stew which was delicious.  There was heaps of food so lots of lovely left-overs! 

December – On 11th, I met up with Shona and Colette in Walkington for lunch.  We haven’t met since this time last year and it was lovely to see them both again.  Colette is looking great and still fighting hard against pancreatic cancer.  We all said we really must make more of an effort to meet up more often in the coming year.

Christmas happened.  It was lovely with the boys here for the day and we all enjoyed an Indian banquet rather than a traditional Christmas dinner.  I got some lovely presents, including a beautiful watch from Patrick.  The blanket I had crocheted for Michael appeared to be appreciated and they all got hand knitted socks and a neckwarmer for Patrick.  After Christmas, Patrick developed a nasty chest infection and it was touch and go whether he would be able to travel down to London when we were to take Michael home and then spend a night in London.  He rallied round like a trooper though and off we set on the Friday.  It took a while to get down there but we arrived safe and sound.  We decided to get ready meals from the Tesco in the town as Patrick wasn’t up to going out.  Michael’s new flat is much nicer than the previous one.  It’s a maisonette in the small town of Rickmansworth just North of London and it looks to be a nice town from what we saw of it on the Saturday morning.  We got the train into London which took about 40 minutes and as we couldn’t check into the hotel early, we decided to find the nearest Craft Beer Co pub which was about a 15 minute walk away.  After a couple of beers we made our way back to the hotel to get freshened up for the evening out.  I wanted to see the Christmas lights of central London so we made our way to Oxford Street to start with.  There seemed to be some sort of dickhead-drivers rally going on with a convoy of extremely expensive sporty (and very noisy) cars revving their engines whilst stuck in the heavy traffic of central London.  The lights were spectacular and we spent a good couple of hours wandering around enjoying the atmosphere.  Patrick’s blog and photo slideshow does the whole thing more justice here.

So, that was 2019, sorry for the overload in one massive blog.  I think I need to make sure and blog more regularly in 2020! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cornwall Holiday – Heligan and Charlestown

I have always wanted to visit the Lost Gardens of Heligan since seeing them featured on TV many years ago, possibly on Gardener’s World which I used to enjoy watching in the 1980s and 1990s. It is probably the most romantic of stories behind a garden restoration ever and evocative of the changes in the social history of our country between the wars. In a nutshell, after the gardeners of Heligan Estate went off to fight in WW1, many of them never to return home, the gardens and indeed the estate fell into disrepair. After the heir emigrated to New Zealand, having no interest in Heligan it became forgotten and ‘lost’. It was in 1990 during excavations for new buildings where the old Heligan House had stood that they were rediscovered and the restoration began.

The weather was very misty as we set of from Bude to the south but we were optimistic in our shorts. We decided to cut across Bodmin Moor with trusty Google navigation leading the way. As I was driving, I was hoping we didn’t have a repetition of the hairy drive of yesterday. There were a couple of single track sections, characteristic of the area, very winding and then suddenly into a small village or hamlet. I think I coped fairly well and quite enjoyed the drive mostly.

Arriving at Heligan, the weather had brightened significantly and the car park was already very busy. We paid our entrance, bought a guidebook and set off to explore.

Roughly following the tours in the guidebook we spent around three and a half hours exploring. Around the formal and kitchen gardens there were several memorials in the form of a photograph of a gardener in his military uniform and a potted history of his life, I found these really moving. The woodland walk with the beautiful mud maid was really enjoyable, made more so by the chocolate ice-cream we scoffed on the way.

On the way to the jungle area, we passed a beautiful wildflower meadow buzzing with life. The jungle was stunningly planted with exotic plants of which I don’t know the names. The rope bridge is a bit of a gimmick though in my opinion. The walkways and steps up and down past the ponds and plants made for a really enjoyable walk.

We felt we’d had a good day out, we’d spent time enjoying the more formal gardens, ventured onto the further estate to walk through woodland and trek through the jungle. We visited the wildlife hide and watched the activities at the bird feeders. We saw the livestock, goats, pigs and ducks, geese, chickens and turkey and were thoroughly exhausted by the time we got back to the car.

On the way back to Bude we passed a sign for Charlestown and I remarked to Patrick that it was somewhere I’d have liked to visit. It’s been used in a few film and TV productions and was used as both Truro and also Falmouth in Poldark, when Verity elopes with Captain Blamey for those of you who are fans of show. At the next turning, also signposted Charlestown, I decided to turn in. What a pretty place, with its historic harbour complete with tall ships. We had a lovely walk around down to the harbour and round the beach to a rocky outcrop and then up to the pub overlooking the bay for some well earned refreshment. We were both pleased we’d stopped off there and I’d say its worth a visit if you’re around the area.

Cornwall Holiday – Coastal Hopping

Monday and the weather is dry. Yippee. The forecast wasn’t brilliant but we set off for a drive to Port Isaac, of TV’s Doc Martin fame. As there were some roadworks on the way, we decided to turn off the main road and pop into Boscastle and Tintagel via the more scenic route around the coast.

Boscastle

Boscastle was a nice surprise not knowing what to expect. The car park was packed and we were really surprised at how many visitors were there. Off we set down the main street towards the harbour, which was where everyone else was heading too! As the weather was still looking unsettled, although really warm, I persuaded Patrick to buy a waterproof jacket from an outdoor shop in the town. To be fair, I’ve been trying to get him to buy one for years.

The harbour area although busy with lots of people was strangely peaceful. After taking lots of photos and sitting for a while watching the sea, we set off back to the car, stopping at a tea room on the way for a snack. I had a Cornish cream tea, the scone was huge and Patrick a toasted teacake. We had taken sandwiches with us but they were still in the car!

Tintagel Castle

Next up was Tintagel. We knew that the castle was closed for some building work but decided to go for a walk up the cliff path to view it from afar anyway. The weather by now was bloody roasting, I’m sure Patrick was really chuffed he’d bought that waterproof jacket. The walk to the castle was firstly downhill, then up to the cliff top was quite steep and hard work. We sat on a bench at the top and ate our sandwiches and viewed the castle through the binoculars. A new bridge is being built and it was quite fascinating watching the guys perched wearing harnesses, working right at the end of the section they had made.

We walked down from the cliffs to the beach, which unfortunately isn’t accessible. We could see the cave known as Merlin’s Cave but it didn’t look overly exciting. I was more interested in the information boards showing old pictures of when the area was being mined for tin and silver.   I think we were both trying to put off the inevitable walk back up the steep path to the town but there was no way around it, it had to be done. It was certainly a relief to reach the top.

Tintagel itself is very commercialised. Arthur themed everything and lots of mystical gifts and jewellery shops. We had a look at the outside of the old post office, which is a pretty, medieval building. I took a photo of the outside but we didn’t bother to go inside. I’m pleased we visited though, the walk though hard work was well worth the effort.

Finally on to Port Isaac, using our ‘trusty’ Google navigation! We were directed but missed the turning so after turning around about a mile down the road, came back and turned into a road that appeared to be a single-track, tarmaced replica of Mount Everest with a hairpin bend immediately after turning into it. Thankfully Patrick was driving because my reaction was complete panic and to flap my arms wildly whilst repeatedly shouting “shit”. There was nowhere to go apart from forward so we continued only to round another bend and come face to face with another car. Now at this point I was wondering if I could just get out and run because I was seriously worried about Daisy’s ability to continue up this hill after having to stop! Thankfully the other driver reversed up to a passing place and we were able to squeeze past and be on our way. The road probably wasn’t that long but it felt endless and we were rather relieved to get to the end.

In Port Isaac we parked in the car park which claimed to be 750 metres from the village. We had decided by now that a Cornish meter is much longer that a normal, metric metre but even allowing for that it was a damn long walk down a hill that we were very conscious of having to come back up again. The harbour area was pretty, in that Cornish way of coloured cottages climbing up from the harbour and lots of narrow, winding lanes. Not having watched Doc Martin at all, we didn’t have that fun of trying to recognise landmarks though and I think we were both a bit too tired to be much bothered to be honest and after wandering around for half an hour and spotting a mama and baby herring gull having a bite to eat, we decided we’d earned a beer so popped into one of the pubs, the Golden Lion.

Mama & baby Herring Gulls

All in all we’d had a really enjoyable but tiring day but pleased we saw the places we visited.

See below for a slideshow of today’s photographs.

Cornwall Holiday – Sir Goldsworthy Gurney

Sunday morning dawned chucking down with rain. What a horrid start to our holiday after the glorious weather of the journey down. After a little research we decided to pop into Bude and visit the Heritage centre, Bude Castle. It was built by and the home of Cornwall’s forgotten genius Sir Goldsworthy Gurney (what a fabulous name) in 1830, it was the first building on sand with specially constructed foundations and though he was mocked at the time and people said the building wouldn’t last, it’s still standing and in use today. Well worth a visit, the museum was absolutely fascinating and I’m astounded that we’d never heard of this man before. Inventor of the steam drag, a precursor to steam engines on railways which ultimately failed due to lack of investment because the smart money was going into railways, he went on to invent limelight and the Bude Light which illuminated the House of commons and Trafalgar Square among others and he developed the system of the light with a revolving shield still used in lighthouses to this day.

I really enjoyed learning about the man and his inventions.

We enjoyed the other exhibits on shipwrecks and the Bude canal as well as a moving display dedicated to the American rangers stationed at Bude to train for the D-Day landings. A walk around the art on show in the various galleries in the castle and a sandwich and cuppa in the cafe conservatory overlooking the beach completed our visit.

With the weather getting even wetter, we jumped back into the car to drive round to Widemouth Bay for a look. Then back to Morrisons to buy ingredients for fish pie. My turn to cook tonight!

So wet and miserable that there are no photos taken today apart from the ones of the cottage that I added to the post for yesterday.

Cornwall Holiday – Arrival

After an uneventful drive of just short of three hours we arrived in Stratton and found our cottage. It was evident that parking was going to be difficult, the ‘ample street parking’ as described by the owner is clearly only available at times when the village is deserted! We were very early for check-in anyway so headed off to Bude for shopping.

When we got back to Stratton, we were lucky that a kindly neighbour took pity on us trying to unload the car (parked halfway back to Bude) and directed us to a space nearby.

Higher Townsend cottage is very old and rustic shall we say! It’s very quaint with its thatched roof and rickety wooden door, complete with enormous key.

Cottage exterior.
Living room

The living room is comfortable but the furniture is shabby and a bit fusty smelling to be truthful. The staircase to the bedroom leads off the living room and is wonderfully wonky, typical of a cottage of this age obviously. The kitchen is a small extension and is adequately equipped for a holiday let but by no means as good as some we’ve stayed in. There is a sweet little courtyard area at the back next to the kitchen which was bathed in sunshine when we had unpacked the shopping so what better than to sit out there and enjoy a beer!

The bedroom and bathroom are furnished nicely and are clean and welcoming. The wonky floors slope just enough to fool you and trip you up late at night…. and Patrick found a little secret door in the bathroom that leads to another staircase down into the dining room.

It’s

It’s a really quirky little place but I have to say that the living room lets it down a bit for me. The place is old but that doesn’t mean the furniture has to be!

We decided to see the lay of the land around Stratton, or specifically the local hostelries of which there are two. We thought that we may eat at one or both of them during the week so a bit of a reccy really. First up was The Tree Inn. I was expecting a bit of a gastropub after reading online reviews but we only popped into the public bar so didn’t see the restaurant. We bought a drink and sat out in the yard at a table. There was a table of local characters at the next table who seemed to find us very interesting. I felt like a zoo exhibit and it didn’t endear the place to me. Next up was the Kings Arms. I preferred this one but Patrick didn’t care for it. We again sat outside as there was no one at all in the pub, as there hadn’t been in the Tree. We may give them another try one evening but we didn’t feel comfortable in either of them on Saturday afternoon.